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Multitasking Is Not Possible.

Yes, that’s a bold claim in today’s world of smartphones and filled schedules.

Almost all of us “multitask” at home and at work. We proudly stamp it on our resumes and talk about it on interviews. And we do it in the most unnatural spaces, like at the dinner table or while talking to our loved ones. But, in actuality, the human mind is consciously capable of doing only one thing at a time. The email-checking, text-replying, car-driving, coffee-sipping, call-taking, lunch-making, bag-lifting, car-locking is not, in fact, happening all at once. Your brain is constantly switching between these things at such a rapid rate that some of us get very worn down fast. But there are other people we know that get very good at it. But good for how long? Running a mental marathon, for some, may take months or even many years before a limit is felt. But that wall is there, and it’s approaching faster with the more you attempt to juggle. What is the wall? It could be a mental breakdown, constant muscle aches, inability to sleep or concentrate, or a series of sicknesses ranging from colds to many more debilitating issues simply because the body and its immune system are so run down.

I recommend doing less consciously, going so far as to focus only on that meal until it’s done, only that text until it’s done, only that errand until it’s done.

Consciously finishing just one thing then moving to the next will likely have you, over the course of the day, doing about the same amount of stuff but without the stress, fatigue, and headache that goes along with pretending you’re a walking smartphone.

On the other side of the mind’s abilities is what goes on behind the scenes. Unconsciously, your mind is able to do more in a few seconds than you’d be able to imagine doing while awake. So, I also recommend doing more unconsciously. Here, by “unconscious,” I mean wakeful resting, meditation, walking, yoga, Pilates, or anything that isn’t filled with fast-paced, adrenaline-filled activity. By “unconscious,” I also do mean actual sleep. Do try to get seven to eight hours each night. For tips on dealing with insomnia, click here.

Now, I don’t say all this because it just sounds like a good idea. Trying all of this, doing the same things in your life but differently, will allow you the freedom to live a more balanced, peaceful life. I know this sounds good too, but balance and peace mean longevity. And longevity means being able not only to keep up with your peers but also to find you may even outpace them, simply because you’re taking the time to invest in yourself. This will not only serve you in getting done all those tasks you take on but with much less wear and tear and with more health and joy along the way.

Put love into your mind, and it will love you back.

Try this: Breath Breaks

You eat three to six times per day. How about three breath “meals” per day? What I mean is anytime, anywhere (except while driving), close your eyes and take three very deep breaths. Completely fill your lungs, all the way filled, and then completely empty the lungs, all the way out, until there is no more breath to be found. Perform three breaths like this, and then go back to your day. Take three breath breaks like this and you’ll notice a difference in the first day or two. I recommend doing this for one week, at least. Your nervous system will relax, your mental acuity will improve, and you’ll better avoid those stressful reactions to all the changes that life will bring you. Enjoy!

Try this: Detox Your Emotions

Click here for a meditation on emotional detoxification.


Jason Moskovitz, L.Ac., Dipl.O.M. is the author of Arthritis: Secrets of Natural Healing. Jason is a board-licensed acupuncturist, national diplomate of oriental medicine, herbal physician, nutritional counselor, and Tai Chi instructor at Tao Of Wellness. He has administered thousands of successful treatments in areas of women’s health, infertility, elder care, and joint pain. Jason teaches his patients how to embrace their ever-changing condition and all the ways in which the body can heal itself. Connect with Tao Of Wellness on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.